From Bare to Brilliant White

“How dare you mock me?”, I say,
squatting near your dusty wall,
your drawers of ripe old age,
have witnessed much life, much
rise and fall;
You’ve been with me through many tears,
witnessed hopes, dreams, and fears,
trials and tribulations,
“Wow, I can’t believe I’ve kept you all of these years.”
Were there when I was a baby,
and have witnessed so much more,
watched me grow up fast,
walk through many bedroom doors;
Ah! What a brilliant shade of white,
it shouted anew in 2010,
Contained within it’s
ever changing confines,
are an assortment of odds and ends:
A jar of beer caps, some flossers, and
guitar tuner which is likely dead;
The 80s live on in an old baseball handbook
while a memory book lies above
college diploma, received from
all those painstakingly boring classes I took;
And the ties of assorted taste, and
honor roll medal from high school,
discarded toothbrush in the back,
and hydrocodones from the old Liz I knew;
Let me keep you, dearly durable drawer,
and all of your companions,
Because I love you to the moon and more;
I have never had another dresser,
this same one from my youth,
and as the years roll on,
and life changes colors,
I realize I can never let go of you

Writing 201

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WPC: New Life

0926
One of my distant relatives had a baby on September 26,2014 named Josh

Into the world
Came a fresh new face
The epic journey begins


Weekly Photo Challenge: New

From Under the Coffee Table

What’s your earliest memory involving another person? Recreate the scene — from the other person’s perspective.


Obviously, the vague memory of my mother and the time she picked me up off the floor to go to the hospital is the first thing that comes to mind. That was the first time I can remember seeing her. I was a little older than one. According to mom’s frantic pants and hints about “It’s acting up again”, I was having digestive problems once more. The following is me following the experience as my mom.

~~~~

“Matthew!”, she shouted with panic in her voice.

He was crawling under the living room coffee table, hitting his head against the wood and making some sort of grunting sound. Jill immediately became concerned and thoughts of those grueling doctor visits came back to mind. Obviously it was his digestive problems again. Bob was working the night shift at Meijer so she was the only one around to take action.

“I can’t do this anymore, we’re going to the hospital.”

Jill scrambled over and picked up the little baby, dressed in his red and white striped outfit, in her rough callused hands and rushed out the white front door and into the chilly air in the middle of the night. Running across the slick pavement, her motherly instincts kicked in with more worries of trouble with Matthew arising. She reached the family’s purple mini-van and slid open the side door with Matthew in one arm.

P100605125

Jill tucked him into his car seat, he just sitting there and not saying anything, and hopped into the driver’s seat, pulling out of BA’s parking spot with the fierceness of a deranged woman. She kept looking in the rear view mirror to see if Matt was okay. He still couldn’t talk so her assessment of his problems was tough, having to go by certain signals that arose, things that immediately made Jill know he was in trouble. Matthew just sat there calmly, probably having no clue what was going on right now and would likely not remember much of tonight’s events.

Rushing out of the subdivision and into the bustling city of Jackson, Jill arrived at the hospital, checked in, and got Matthew into a room quickly. The nurse already knew about his problems and calmly nodded and placed the baby carefully on the bed.

“I’ve been through this so many times already”, Jill said sarcastically. “How long will it be before you are done with him?”

The nurse looked apologetically at me and said calmly, “He’ll stay overnight, but you’re free to stay with him if you like.”

“Yeah, that won’t be a problem.”

So as a mother protective of her first newborn, Jill sat through the night in that hospital room, as Matthew was treated for his IBS. But she didn’t remember all the details since the nurse told her to step outside while certain procedures were done. So Jill waited in the lobby, impatiently sitting in an uncomfortable armchair, her face all flushed, heart rate jumping a mile a minute. She just wanted to have her baby back and have everything be okay with him. Jill was tired of these regular trips to the wing. Something needed to be done quickly about her boy’s problems.

The next morning, she went in the room and saw the nurse standing at the end of Matthew’s bed. He was lying near the headboard, quiet and innocent looking. The nurse was checking something off a clipboard she held. White curtains hung around the bed, shielding Matthew from disturbance and creating a peaceful canopy for him.

“Is he okay?”, Jill asked.

“Yeah, it was a rough night, had to get him to stay still while I took care of things. He cried a lot”

“Will we have to do this again or is this it?”

“No, I believe he is going to be okay now. Everything has been taken care off. But if the problem resumes, you can always come back and we’ll do more tests.”

“Okay, well, I’ve got to get to work soon.”

Jill looked at her baby thoughtfully, just happy that he was still there, as unassuming as could be. Her love for him increased largely.

“You’re coming home with mommy now,” the nurse said to Matthew in a playful voice. He looked at the nurse curiously while fidgeting with the folds of the blanket he was lying on.

There was a certain airy feeling in this room, almost like a dream, or at least that’s how Jill felt, feeling joyful, waiting eagerly for her baby to be back in her arms.

“Are you okay, Matthew?”, she asked with light concern. “We’re going home today, you should be all better now.”

“Yup, he’s doing fine now”, the nurse agreed, moving over to the bed to pick up the baby.

“Matthew”, Jill cooed. “Hey, look up here at mommy.”

And indeed, everything was fine now because the nurse smiled happily at Matthew as she held him and then at me, and Jill chortled softly, knowing that this was just one of countless experiences to happen with her child down the long road. She wondered if he would remember even the faintest details about it.

– Obviously what you just read here might not all be true. I improvised some of it since I do not remember what happened in between the trip to the hospital and the next morning.


Daily Prompt 10/17/14

WPC: Earning Cash, Saving Lives

0213 Saving A Life

This picture was taken back in February 2014 at the CSL Plasma center in Lansing, Michigan where my family and I go to donate plasma (the pale-yellow, mainly water portion of the blood) and earn about sixty dollars per week on two separate days: $20 on the first and about $40 on the second. At the time I was working on a 365 day photo project and this sign seemed like a great addition to the mix. The photograph means something special to me because my family and I are actually saving people’s lives (in a fragmented way) by supplying various hospitals and clinics with the essential components from our donated plasma, including proteins and antibodies, needed to make certain life-saving medicines. This is a multibillion dollar worldwide business that is viewed both strongly and negatively by various organizations because of the immediate dangers of pathogenic diseases such as AIDS/HIV being spread through the blood, tainting the plasma, and infecting patients receiving it but this seems to be under control. Continue reading “WPC: Earning Cash, Saving Lives”