My Netflix Addiction

Never has one online site given me more satisfaction and hours of endless entertainment than the addicting nature of Netflix. As soon as I start watching one TV series, I usually chow through the first season in about two to five days depending on the length of season. I watched the entire six seasons of Lost in about two weeks (enjoying and understanding it better – so that’s why there was a smoke monster), the entire nine seasons of How I Met Your Mother (what happened to this show in syndication?) in about six months, since I had to wait for the ninth and final season to appear on Netflix, all five seasons of Breaking Bad in about a month (inspiring me to search for all of the songs used in every season – it was quite a diverse and unique soundtrack…bitch!), and all eight seasons of Dexter (spoiler alert – the last three seasons totally jumped the shark – seriously, a lumberjack?)

When has not having cable or satellite ever made more sense?

As the name of the prompt today is sanctuary, I would call Netflix my place to get away, especially on my personal laptop where I can watch content at my own pace and privacy with high quality sound being pumped from my headphones into my ears. Whenever I am feeling so amped up and disconnected from myself, I prefer to hit up the streamies and watch the next episode in that great series I am currently involved with, which is sort of like dating someone for a long while before the money and other interests run out and you move on to the next candidate (can i date?) – bad analogy? Perhaps.

Netflix is a comforting thing, a truly enjoyable experience. It is a place I go to whenever I am feeling stressed, need to recollect my thoughts, find my happy place, or just figure out when I am finally going to start watching House of Cards. I see it as a great way to replace the boring parts of my life with the exciting, interesting lives of the actors and actresses decking it out in some of my favorite series and movies.

It is quite hard to leave a viewing session once I get my teeth sunk into an intriguing series, because for one thing, Netflix automatically starts a ten second countdown to the next episode, along with a juicy description of the next episode that makes me say, after already watching seven episodes in a row, “Just one more and I’ll go to bed.” But, of course, that rarely, if ever, happens. Thanks, Netflix, for turning me into an internet zombie by night (though this is nothing new).

I have to admit I’m a Netflix addict, judging by my constant urge to continue that TV series I had started the day before, or scroll endlessly for a decent movie to watch (any misleading images for action thrillers?) As I already mentioned, it involves me packing it all in for an extra stimulating all-night viewing experience that has a rollercoaster of scenes and audio bits from episodes or movies replaying in my head throughout the next day that I had already spent the wee hours of playing and rewinding to parts of episodes or movies I simply missed or didn’t catch the dialogue clearly from. Do I need a life? I think so, but it’s time to catch the next episode of the quite forgotten sci-fi series The 4400, which I believe is already set to jump the shark by the end of the second season.


 In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Oasis.”

Advertisements

Remember My Name

The little light in the darkness, I’m running towards it, the excitement pulsing through my veins, finally able to see glory. The sound of a crowd cheering, roaring my name, growing from a faint whisper to a sound on the level of a jet engine. Crunch, crunch, crunch, the sound of the gravel goes as I run towards the bright spot. I want them to remember my name, to know who I am. Once I am out in the open, I will proclaim my status, will command them to praise and rejoice in my presence. The crowd is waiting for my arrival. I’m stumbling besides the tracks, my heart beating like a metronome, breath coming in short, painful gasps. Arms flailing, sweat drops rolling on my forehead. I push myself further on, fighting through the pain, until I reach the light, run straight through it, but what do I find? In the name of this post, I would call it blog heaven or blog nirvana, reaching viral fame for the first time.

Today the prompt has asked for us, in the event of viral fame, to write a post we’d like others to remember us byI have a lot of posts in my depository that could be worthy of immortal status, many of them you have never read yet. Many of them are photography related (which received the majority of the “likes” on this blog), some are attempts at poetry – long, short, rhyme, free-verse, haiku. The majority of my posts came from responding to the Daily Prompt, which I treat as the starting points for unleashing the full potential of this blog. I have to say I’ve come a long way since beginning this blog in 2013 on a desktop computer. It now runs faithfully from a Windows 8.1 Toshiba laptop that isn’t perfect but gets the job done. You are free to search through my archives in order to find some great posts I have published in the past, though don’t take them by face value, I was just getting started, hadn’t found my edge yet.

I made a bold attempt at playing Pac-Man today and beating all 256 levels. I think the highest level I’d gotten to in the past was ten. The hard thing about this classic 80s game is that the ghosts get faster and smarter after about the third level. Once the red ghost, Blinky, gets on your ass at around the twelfth level, you have no chance of escaping unless you get to one of the side tunnels in time. Well, the thing is, I’m playing an online version (it’s on pause right now) with the ability to save your progress and I’ve made it pretty far in the game, though I have no idea what level number I’m on, so I guess you can say I’m not really beating Pac-Man (I died about one hundred times), I’m taking advantage of a feature that dumbs down the integrity of the original game. Even with the save feature, I have to be careful not to save my progress and get what I call a “death trap” e.g saving while being cornered by two ghosts, unable to get out it when reloading. It would be neat to reach the final level (not sure if it would be the original ‘Kill Screen”) but I wouldn’t feel total elation because it would be an illegitimate win, one with a safety net down the whole time, and no one would recognize me anyway. But the sound of viral fame spreading like wildfire if I did, in fact, complete the original game on camera (along with getting the highest score possible) without the save feature would be warm, cheerful, and enthusiastic. A regular Billy Mitchell.

The name of this post being inspired by the promotional tagline for the final season of Breaking Bad, if my blog went viral, I would feel incredibly accomplished, amazingly joyful. But I wouldn’t just stop there and believe I was finished with my work because my blog had reached its ultimate goal. I would keep doing what I love, not changing just because of the pressure to continue to impress a much larger audience than before. Yes, there would be pressure to keep this thing up if I broke through the darkness and reached blog heaven, and the fear that I would eventually fall from the top of the mountain, which is inevitable, but it would still be a dream come true. To have people remember me by just one post is not enough. I want to be remembered for everything I’ve done, all the work I’ve accomplished to reach viral status. All of my collective works would be nothing without learning and relearning, reinventing myself everytime something starts to not work anymore. Is viral fame overrated? Perhaps. How long will you be relevant in the public’s eye before you eventually fade away, being replaced by the next best thing? How much work you do have to do to keep the fire burning? If my blog was in digital lights, I would feel well appreciated and thankful, but at the same time would know that no one stays at the top forever. I’ve never had anything of mine “break the Internet”, a term coined for Kim Kardashian’s nude photo shoot attempt at doing so, and even if I never get to have that honor, I would still feel happy with how much I’ve done, how much I’ve learned, and all the fun I’ve had participating in this worldwide wide activity we call blogging.


In Response to the Daily Prompt: For Posterity