Death and All His Friends

Image result for death and all his friends

The leaders
The winners
The ones to rule

The followers
The sheep herd
They play the fool

Death and all his friends
Death and all his friends
They parade up the street
And back down again

Great big torches they carry
Lighting up the cricket-filled night
“Sabotage!” they shout
“Fight! Fight! Fight!”

#NaNoPoblano2016 Day 26

Advertisements

Death of the Prompt

I hoped to start off my month of March blogging with something enthusiastic and bright, something that would inspire pleasant pictures of spring approaching and kids getting excited for the end of the school year coming up, so why am I having to write about my own death, which would be quite a dark and depressing ordeal? I haven’t even met my future wife yet or moved away from home. I’m 23 years old, haven’t even lived a quarter of a century yet, and I’m already being asked to write my death statement? Geez, give me a break, Daily Prompt, or should I say Daily Downer. Let’s write about something cheery. There are numerous topics that could have been chosen, but you went with the three most gloomy and sad set of words in the English language: write your obituary, like you’re some glorified grim reaper. When I first loaded up the Daily Prompt page (since I still use it as a helpful fuel for my blog), I saw those three morbid words and thought “What? How am I going to write about that?” I mean, this is quite a sick prompt today and I’m not sure I want to read through a bunch of posts about death, basically suicide notes. It’s bad enough having to write an obituary for someone else, but I definitely can’t muster enough to write my own. It’s ridiculous.

Maybe if I were the President I would be writing my own obituary, planning my own funeral, but since I’m just an ordinary regular person I’m here to think about now, not writing the ending of my story.

I’m scared for the future of this Daily Prompt device. I believe it deserves its own obituary:

It was a nice place to gather ideas
A great way to jumpstart your thoughts
But then it hit a snag and relied on archives
And soon got stuck in rehash
Something happened to the spirit and enthusiasm
Of this dear device we once knew
The Daily Prompt:
A thing of the past;
It’s memory now lives on forever
In the clutches of the Internet

In Loving Memory of The Daily Prompt: 2008? – 2015


In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: In Loving Memory

Write your obituary.

Paying My Grand Respects

Dear Uncle Dwight, spiritual being,

I may not have known you personally or even gotten a real chance to get to know you, but I have to say your “going away party” was the best thing that I had ever witnessed in my life, a real honor and privilege to have been apart of, even more adding to the fact that it happened to fall on my sister Emily’s 19th birthday, the symbolic celebration of life advancing and life ending hard to ignore.

You were a great man, who accomplished many things in your lifetime, notably being a teacher of many and inspiring others to learn, and serving in the Michigan National Guard, taking an important part in defending this great nation. All of the family still living were in attendance, many of them I had never met, saying their goodbyes, paying their respects, telling marshmallowy stories of you and how you made certain family members lives better with your joyful presence, and how you graciously helped out individuals, including my father when he was going through his first hip replacement back in 2001 – you were willing to put aside your own schedule to help a friend or relative in need, and that shows how unselfish a person you were.

I especially enjoyed the story of how you, when you were a young lad, used to sit in the back of the church, the very same one you were laid in today, and always make noise, such as tapping your Kiwanis Club ring on the pew or talking loudly with a friend, until your mother supposedly whispered, “Quiet, Dwight!” I would have never known it before, but you were quite a humorous individual, who loved to make others laugh, and could brighten up anyone’s day in an instant, just because you were so free spirited and full of happiness. You were quite the life of the party when you were living, and I can only imagine that you will continue to be that way while living within the pearly gates.

“And I will raise you up on eagle’s wings” – Singing those hymnal songs was one of the best moments of your funeral service, the togetherness really coming alive, the serious matter of the moment in the air being cut through like a knife, cheerfulness instantly spreading to everyone in the church. I hadn’t sung church songs in so long, I forgot how wonderful it sounded to have my voice ring out, to feel my vocal cords vibrating, joining the the warm chorus of spiritually invigorating music, only this time it didn’t seem empty, had a definite purpose – I and everyone else were singing to you; this was your time to shine, your victory celebration, celebrating a good long life and how it touched many other people’s lives in truly amazing ways. One of your favorite church hymns, “Amazing Grace”, was the final to be sung, and there are not enough words to describe how special a moment it was singing with everyone, young and old.

Reverend Elias Murbiro from Zimbabwe did an incredible preaching about your life and how you have gone from a “physical body to a spiritual body”, repeating those words a number of times during the sermon, each time with a daring burst of soul in his voice. His words were packed with power and ultimate enthusiasm, really uplifting the spirits of all who mourned in the small church on a chilly February afternoon in Saginaw, your’s and the Chisholms’ home for many years. His voice was so booming, I could literally feel my hymnal book vibrating.

80 years. That’s a good long life. Nice round number. Eight decades worth of events, many of them historical. When you were born in 1934, Iran was Persia, The Three Stooges had just been introduced, and Adolf Hitler had just taken over as the head power, or Fuhrer, of Germany, and 90% of the population actually approved of his presidential power – that percentage supposedly went down over time. The price of gas in ’34 was a mere 10 cents. The Great Depression was ending.

So here’s to an incredible life worth living every day, and how you never let one moment slip away while you were in your prime; from enjoying some of your favorite hobbies such as hunting, fishing, and writing music, to doing the thing you loved the most – teaching, going from educating high school kids to continuing to spread the gift of knowledge in retirement.

Best wishes in the afterlife,

Your nephew,

Matt

Through the Ages

Let me take you on a journey that started as a seed

That grew from being fed and watered and became the life of me

At age zero, I was barely existent, my eyes still small and feeble

At age one, my ears started listening, and crawling led to people

At age two, I began to walk and not long after I could also talk

At age three, my sister arrived and I was no longer special

At age four, I soaked up knowledge like a sponge, the building blocks were no wrestle

At age five, my memories started pouring like concrete, things becoming sharper and clear

At age six, I woke up in a car and my life seemed to shift into high gear

At age seven, I was silent by far, and with autism trouble first arrived

My grandfather died that year and I soon became familiar with death’s fateful eye

At age eight, the world was still unknown, I had not reached the big climb

At age nine, summer school was a drone and my problems became more in line

At age ten, I smiled at the last decade but there was still something missing, no friends to partake

At age eleven, my body starting rearranging, moving into phase two

At age twelve, my last grandmother perished, and I did not know what to do

At age thirteen, the adolescent slump was difficult to manage, my life fairly poor and simple,

At age fourteen, things started to look up, I finally had a principle

At age fifteen, I kicked into high school, my final leg beginning

At age sixteen, the pedal finally felt my force, the car crazily spinning

At age seventeen, my first love came by dance floor, my worries finally subsiding

At age eighteen, I finally finished school, and it seemed like smooth riding 

At age nineteen, my studies were anew, a new freedom, a new edge

At age twenty, I finally found a money line, that was as easy as music on a bed

At age twenty-one, the speed limits were over, I was free to go wild as ever

At age twenty-two, I was suddenly not a child, and life started to become weathered

At age twenty-three, I am writing about the journey, how it twisted and turned and got me learning

That I was not invincible, my faults became clear, my eyes were opened, my ears became to hear

I am human like everyone else, complete with jagged edges, not perfect all at, still trimming the hedges

But I have never viewed myself as immortal, for that would be a boastful crime,

When death comes I will embrace it, 

The only thing immortal will be the words I leave behind


Daily Prompt 10/20/14

The feature image is of an immortal hydra polyp found in 2012 that could be the key to slowing down the aging process in humans, leading to near-immortality.