Planet Earth Is Blue

David Bowie’s signature song, and the one he takes to his resting place, is “Space Oddity”, and somewhere deep in space, the soundwaves that long ago emitted from a radio station on Earth will reach a distant world. Will there be anyone on that world to hear the ballad of Major Tom and how he surrendered to the unpredictable and unknown nature of outer space? Will they send back a response song to Earth that may or may not still be there thousands of years from now?

That of course is one of my top favorite songs of all time because it was written just before the Apollo 11 moon landing in July 1969. Houston control decided not to play the song over the speakers until the mission was proven successful, which of course it was. David Bowie wrote the lyrics to the song predicting what would happen when men flew to the moon. It was predicted as ending in tragedy. Before it was released, critics of Bowie worried that the song would be seen as a promotional stunt for the mission.

I find it a bit ironic (or maybe it’s a just a coincidence) that Bowie died at the age of 69, a number obviously symbolic with space travel as if the universe knew all along.

Chris Hadfield’s cover of it aboard the ISS is simply beautiful. It was recorded in 2013 and was the very first music video shot in space. The shots of the Earth and the space station outside are unbelievable. The lyrics were updated to change the ending from the astronaut dying to a heroic mission.

I see Earth! It is so beautiful!
I could have gone on flying through space forever.
– quote by Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space

If I were stuck in space and had nowhere to go and my ending was inevitable, I’d think of Earth and so much that I’d miss. All the animals and plants, the air that I freely breath, the joy of seeing the sun rise over the trees every morning, the comfort of the moonlight. Of course, there are things I’d not miss like all of the greedy people and violence happening all the time.

If it were a trip to Mars, and there was no return to the home planet, I would feel a disconnect and vulnerability but after living on the Red Planet for a while and getting used to the environment, the homesick feeling wouldn’t be so bad. Seeing the blue marble disappear slowly into the background would have a way of making me feel how small we all are in general. For there is so much more to see beyond our shallow borders of ignorance.

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Share Your World – 2016 Week #2

  • Do you believe in extraterrestrials or life on other planets? 
  • How many places have you lived? You can share the number of physical residences and/or the number of cities.
  • If you were given $22 million tax free dollars (any currency), what is the first thing you would do?
  • The Never List: What are things you’ve never done? Or things you know you never will do?

Do you believe in extraterrestrials or life on other planets? 

Why, yes, because Earth cannot possibly be the only place in the entire expanding universe that contains life. I’m still confident that there is microscopic life on Mars, if water has been proven to exist, with unicellular organisms living in the ice caps. There might be other universes out there as well that contain planets thriving with life. We have only scratched the surface on what lies outside of our little safe haven here. I’m certain that the lifeforms we may find will not be the typical grey or green alien men depicted in cartoons and science fiction films and shows, but something a little more realistic.

How many places have you lived? You can share the number of physical residences and/or the number of cities.

Eight places, all in Michigan. From a small apartment as a baby to living in a mobile park home. There might just be a ninth home when I move to Lee’s Summit in Kansas sometime in the next year or so.

If you were given $22 million tax free dollars (any currency), what is the first thing you would do?

Buy my mom a new car and great big house. I’d of course get into a top notch university and earn another degree, and save some money for my future kids to get into a good college. Then most of that money would go into a savings fund and accumulate interest over time.

The Never List: What are things you’ve never done? Or things you know you never will do?

  1. Gone to a Super Bowl
  2. Been to New York City
  3. Been to a foreign country
  4. Counted to one hundred all in Spanish
  5. Written a book
  6. Gone skydiving
  7. Ridden in a plane
  8. Scubadived
  9. Met a famous actor or actress
  10. Walked through the Amazon rainforest
  11. Looked on the night sky through a powerful telescope
  12. Woken up the next morning with a huge hangover (I am a light drinker)

Latest Share Your World

Life On Mars

What took you guys so long?

The biggest question of my young life so far has finally been answered: there is water on Mars.

Liquid water and at least ten swimming pools of it, someone said, not just puny ice caps. The next big question is if there is enough water and if it’s usuable. It seems a bit anticlimactic, as if scientists knew it all along but finally decided to let out the big secret. I sort of knew it all along, since there can’t possibly be just one planet in the entire universe that supports life. Actually, noone is still quite sure if there is life in those water pools. If there is, there are brand new theories to be discussed and new openings for the fantastic realm of science (sorry, 6,000 year Earth believers). Life may have come from Mars on gigantic pieces of the planet that got broken off during collisions, lifeforms being encased in tiny water droplets and deposited on the once hot and rocky sphere. But if it’s true that life started on Mars, how did it get there? Did it come from yet another planet? It’s the whole “what happened before the Big Bang complexity” How can anything suddenly come from nothing?

Now that the big water question has been solved, it’s time to get going on going to Mars. The Mars One project is in the process of selecting 4 individuals who will take an estimated 4 month journey to the Red Planet and will set up the first colony bases as well as finding a way to grow food and sustain life.

The greatest achievement in human history, other than landing on the moon, will be creating a viable civilization on Mars. To have a place to be once the inevitable ending comes for our earth would be monumental. If I ever got the chance to live on Mars (this is permanent) I probably would gracefully die on the red iron hills, just to have it of record that I’ve one of only so many to have perished on a different planet. But before that my daily life would be within a transparent tubing house, seeing the orange-reddish sky and the dust storms swirling around outside. Eating genetically grown plants that surprisingly don’t taste like rubber. Eating the meat from genetically grown animals stored in an artificial zoo environment. Sleeping on a bed that may have anti-aging powers.

But there’s a million to one chance that will never happen. There’s a slight chance that no human will ever set foot on Mars, something going wrong with the spaceship or the length of the mission pushing the limits of any person on board. I have faith in humanity. I have faith that we can do anything. We are the smartest things in the universe. We were given super intelligent brains to solve and achieve things. If one can solve a Rubik’s cube in as little as 3 moves, one can find a way to land on Mars.

But we still can’t figure out how to stop it from raining or not raining. I suppose we are more adept to figuring out the bigger things in life, some of us at least.

Anyway, that’s my life ending statue: a dusty and rugged suited astronaut holding onto the American flag (or whoever gets there first) on the surface of Mars.

The message on the base of the statue: There’s no going back. Only forward.


In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Immortalized in Stone.”

Your personal sculptor is carving a person, thing or event from the last year of your life. What’s the statue of and what makes it so significant?